Sales Contract Basics

equine law contracts estate planning business One of the big issues in equine law concerns buying a horse. Many people buy one on a handshake, trusting the other person at her word. Unfortunately, doing so can lead to both headaches and heartaches. Having a simple sales contract can make the experience a positive one for all parties. You want to make sure that your sales contract contains certain required parts. The best way to have a secure, and legally-binding sales contract is to hire an equine attorney to draft one. This blog explains some of the important parts the attorney will include in that contract.

Sales Contract

A horse sale contract should include the names of the seller and buyer and all the details of the sale. A thorough description of the horse should be included and one or more pictures can even be attached. If the horse is registered, then the contract should state the registry and registration number. Keep in mind that the seller is held to whatever description is included in the sales contract. For example, if the contract says the sale is for a Paint mare, then the seller has made the guaranty that she is selling a Paint mare. If she delivers a sorrel Quarter Horse instead, she is breaching that contract.

boarding barn sales breeding training riding liabilityThe price of the horse as well as any payment terms should also be in the contract. Sometimes a buyer needs to make payments on a horse instead of paying the entire sale price upfront. If the seller agrees to this, the payment terms should be clearly spelled out in the sales contract, including the amounts and the dates by which they should be paid. The seller can even require the payments be made in a certain manner, such as by electronic deposit instead of by check. Terms should be included that address what happens if the buyer fails to make a timely payment or is unable to pay the entire amount within the time frame specified in the contract. If the seller and buyer renegotiate the payment terms, that new agreement should be written up, signed by both parties, and attached to the original contract.

“As Is” Clauses

You may see what is called an “as is” clause in a sales contract. Such a clause means that the buyer accepts the horse in the condition at the time of the sale, and the seller makes no further guaranties about the horse. Even though these situations are common in the horse world, a buyer should still be cautious. If there is a particular issue a buyer is concerned about, for example lameness or a training issues like bucking, then the buyer should make sure that issue is addressed in the contract.

Even though “as is” clauses are legal, a seller may be liable if she engages in fraud. For example, a seller can’t lie about the horse, stating the horse is sound when she knows the horse is lame. If a pre-purchase exam (PPE) is performed the contract should mention it as well as any details, such as who will be performing the PPE. The contract should include any limitations the buyer is accepting. For example, if the vet states that the horse may need hock injections in five years or is not capable of becoming a Grand Prix jumper due to physical limitations, include those restrictions in the sales contract. Doing so can prevent a future lawsuit or aid in defending one by showing that everyone was on the same page with the same expectations about the horse at the time of purchase.

Two Important Sections

contracts estate planning business trademarkThere are two sections in a sales contract that are important to include. One is an explanation of who will pay attorney’s fees if the sale winds up in court for some reason. Litigation is expensive, and you may find that you win a court case but wind up losing financially when you add in what you must pay your attorney for winning the case. You can avoid this possibility by including a section stating that the party who loses at trial will pay attorney’s fees for the party who wins. In addition, you want the contract to set forth what state will have jurisdiction if the matter goes to court. Imagine living in Massachusetts and buying a horse in California. You would not want to go to California to litigate any problems.

While it may cost a bit more, you should have an equine attorney or at least an attorney familiar with contracts draft your sales contract for you. A little bit of foresight can save a lot of time, money, and energy if something goes wrong with the sale. Contact me today if you are buying or selling a horse, and let’s make sure you have a contract in place so the sale can be a pleasant experience for all involved.

This blog post is for educational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship.  Seek an attorney’s advice for your specific situation. 

 

 

 

Brand your company

equine estate planning liability releases equine contracts equine businessBusiness reputation is important in the horse world. In this blog, I am going to explain how registering your trademark is an important way to protect your professional reputation. If you don’t protect your brand, someone can use your name, logo, or slogan, and you can’t stop them. Someone could also use your name, logo, or slogan and hurt your business by doing disreputable business.

Two Trainers, One Stolen Logo

I once knew someone – we’ll call her Sally – who moved cross country after riding with a trainer – we’ll call her Mary – for years in Florida. Sally started to search for a new riding horse in her new home. She came across a horse on a horse sales website that interested her and went to the listed website to learn more about the horse and the person selling the horse. She was shocked at what she found. On the main page of the website was the logo for Mary’s barn! It was flipped, as if appearing in a mirror, but it was clearly the same logo. Sally knew that Mary’s brother had hand drawn the logo several years before. She immediately contacted Mary to tell her about the stolen logo. Mary was a highly-successful trainer so she said she wasn’t worried about it. She said that no one would confuse her training services with the trainer who had stolen the logo. Besides, Mary lived all the way across the country. Sally never pursued the horse that led her to the website. She figured if that trainer would steal a logo, what else would she do that was dishonest.

Hurting Your Business

horse law questions jo belascoMary didn’t think there was a problem with the other trainer using her logo because Mary was a higher-level and more famous trainer, plus she lived across the country. But such thinking can leave an equine professional open to problems. What if Mary decided she wanted to expand her training to that area? What if people looking online simply assumed that Mary and the trainer who stole her logo were somehow affiliated and that trainer engaged in deceptive practices? Or was a bad trainer? Or abused the horses under her care? Mary might be losing clients and gaining a bad reputation without even knowing it.

Trademark Registration

Mary could have prevented these problems by registering the logo with United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO). The USPTO defines a trademark as a “word, phrase, symbol or design, or a combination of words, phrases, symbols, or designs, that identifies and distinguishes the source of the goods of one party from those of others.” If Mary had a registered trademark, then she could have had an attorney force the trainer to take it off her website, either through a cease-and-desist letter or a lawsuit.

One of the main reasons for registering a trademark harkens back to horses and livestock. It relates to branding. You may have heard that you should brand your company. Branding your company is a way of identifying your business and setting you apart from your competition. Registering a trademark is an important part of branding. Why? Because one of the main issues the USPTO considers when determining if a trademark should be granted is whether it creates confusion in the marketplace. Let’s say you want to create a company that provides packages of natural supplements to horse owners. And you want to call it SmartyPak. Your chances of getting that trademark approved are slim to none Why? Because SmartPak, the supplement company, already has that name trademarked. Allowing for two similar trademarks would cause confusion in the marketplace.

What happens if you don’t register your trademark? Well, someone else could register the same or similar name. That may not seem like a big deal but think of this. Once someone has a registered trademark, they can enforce it by issuing cease-and-desist letters to companies that are using their trademark. They can even take that company to court. Let’s say you are using a certain business name and another company trademarks it. Even if you can avoid court, you will have to rebrand. What does that mean? You have to choose a new name and reform your company with that new name. You have to change all of your merchandise to the new name. You have to let your customers and clients know. It can be a very expensive and time-consuming endeavor, as you might well imagine.

Save yourself the time, money, and headache. Contact me today so I can talk to you about the registration process and how to protect your equine business.

 

 

Nonprofit Property Purchase

massachusetts equine law attorney jo belascoWhen you have a horse nonprofit, whether you are rescuing horses or providing horse therapy or some other work with horses, you invariably run into the issue of where to hold your programs. Having horses means there is a need for land to house those horses as well as having a safe, secure place where you can run programs with them. I have seen several scenarios where equine nonprofits have leased property and then run into difficulty when the lease ends. I have read Facebook posts from horse nonprofit leaders desperately seeking land for horses that need homes or even trying to rehome the horses themselves. Some nonprofits have even ceased functioning or had to put their programs on hiatus while a new location is found. How can you avoid these scenarios? By having your nonprofit own its own property.

Purchasing Property

Contrary to what many people think, a nonprofit can buy and own property. The first thing to know when deciding whether your nonprofit should buy property is that your board of directors must be involved. Since nobody owns a nonprofit, the board must be consulted about any property purchase. Your bylaws should actually include a provision that allows your board to make such a decision and exercise the right to buy property.

Another thing to keep in mind is that the property needs to be related to your nonprofit’s mission statement. Otherwise, you may need to pay taxes on it, and you may not be able to use grants and donations to purchase it. For example, if you rescue horses, and you purchase property, you might have to pay taxes on that property if you use it to raise Angus cattle instead. You might also have to pay taxes on the cattle sales as unrelated income. I say might because without knowing your nonprofit’s mission statement, I can’t say for certain. Selling Angus cattle might actually relate to your nonprofit’s mission.

Loans

massachusetts equine attorney lawyer joanne jo belascoAgain, while most people think a nonprofit can’t get a loan to buy property, that simply is not true. I will caution you, though, that it may be more difficult than getting a personal mortgage. Why? As you know, when getting a mortgage, you need to assure the bank that you can pay the mortgage. Unfortunately, many horse nonprofits are huge labors of love, and they don’t bring in  sustainable, dependable revenue. If your nonprofit has been around for many years, and you can show that you can pay off a loan, then you have a chance to get one. But if you are paying for most of the expenses out of your own pocket, or you haven’t been around very long, then you may have to make some changes before you can apply and expect to get a loan.

Grants and Donations

Another way that nonprofits purchase property is by grants and donations. This type of purchase can occur a number of ways. You can get a grant, a donation or several donations, or a combination of the two. If you are running a fundraiser for this specific purpose, then it is called a capital funds campaign. Many grants won’t allow you to use grant money for a capital funds campaign so you need to read the grant proposal carefully before you put in time to get a grant that won’t support your campaign.

You can use donations to buy property but you need to keep the idea of restricted and unrestricted funds in mind. If you receive a donation that is unrestricted, then you can use the funds for any of your programs or nonprofit work. However, if a donation is restricted, then it must be used for the purpose intended by the donor. For example, if someone donates $10,000 and says it’s for the capital funds campaign, then you must use it for that purpose. You may want to even place it in a separate account so that you are sure not to use it until you buy property. What happens if your nonprofit winds up not buying property? You either have to return the money to the donor or get permission from the donor to use it for other nonprofit purposes. I suggest you get that approval in writing, by the way, so there is no confusion at a later time concerning the purpose of the donation.

If you have more questions about purchasing property for your horse nonprofit or need legal services associated with it, please feel free to contact me. Along with equine legal services, I also provide equine business consulting services, including helping equine nonprofits.

The Hazards of Preprinted Liability Releases

As a horse professional, you try to save money wherever you can. As a former horse trainer and clinician, I understand your concern with the bottom dollar. I also remember all the tales I used to hear from clients about the “cheap” hay they had found. They would always tell me they’d gotten a great deal. When the concern would appear on my face, they would tell me — before I could say a word — that they knew the hay was going to be just great. It never failed that after they got the hay, sometimes right away and sometimes after the passage of time, the person would complain that the hay wasn’t as good as they thought it was or even had serious mold in it. The person invariably had to either buy new hay or supplement the hay with grain, and they never got any kind of refund. I guess the take-away is that you get what you pay for.

You Get What You Pay For

The same is true with the legal documents that you use in your horse business. I know it is sorely tempting to get inexpensive legal documents off the Internet for your horse business, but doing so could literally cost you that business in the end. Let’s take one of the most popular documents for any horse business, the liability release. Where did you get your current liability release? Did you make it up on your own? Did you buy a preprinted form online from an online legal website? Did you download one from another facility that had one online? If you did any of these things, your liability release may not be worth the paper it’s printed on. And that means it isn’t providing you any protection from a lawsuit.

State Liability Laws

As you probably already know, many laws concerning liability are controlled by state rather than federal statutes. That means that something that is legal in one state may not be legal in another. The problem with downloading a preprinted liability release form from a website, even if it is supposedly written by an attorney, is that the form you download may not be valid in your state. For example, under Massachusetts law, a very specifically-worded warning must appear in your release. That language isn’t included in a preprinted liability release that anyone from any state can download. And yes, I am telling you that I have looked at the forms commonly available for download online, and the required language is not there. I have even found a liability release for download online used by a very popular clinician that is not valid in Massachusetts because it does not contain the required statutory language. What this means for your equine business is that this kind of form is not legally binding here in Massachusetts if someone sues you for injuries and you have to go to court. You may think you are protected but you aren’t.

Changing State Laws

Another problem with online legal forms you can download is that state laws change. An attorney focuses on the law of her own jurisdiction. She doesn’t have the time to constantly look for changes in the laws of all 49 other states so she can update her online release form to make sure it’s valid outside the state where she practices. Doing so may even run afoul of the law concerning the unauthorized practice of law in a jurisdiction where she is not licensed to practice. You leave yourself open to liability if you rely on a release drafted by an attorney who is not licensed to practice law in your state and whose business is keeping abreast of all the changes and updating forms accordingly.

Completed Incorrectly

You can even have problems if the forms themselves are valid simply because you don’t know how to fill it out properly. I know of a case where a barn that downloaded a liability release from the Internet and got sued wound up in big trouble. The release they used did them no good because they had neglected to put their barn’s name in the spaces left blank for that purpose. They simply didn’t know how to fill out the form properly and never had a local attorney check it over. In the end, they lost a lot because of trying to save money in the wrong place.

As an attorney, I am trained to pay attention to details. While this can be frustrating for some life activities – making sure every piece of leather is tucked into its keeper even though I’m just going on a short ride and no one will see me or my horse, for instance – it is essential when doing legal work. I know what language legally has to be there for your liability release to hold up in court. As a Massachusetts attorney, it’s my job to pay attention to the ways Massachusetts law may change and how that change impacts you and the liability release you use. And as an equine attorney, I know what things might be important in a liability release for your specific business that might not be important for someone else’s. Think of it this way: a liability release is meant to protect you from being sued successfully. If it can’t do that because it doesn’t meet Massachusetts state law or isn’t filled out properly, then what’s the point of having it? It’s just a worthless piece of paper.

So, while you may cringe at having to pay an attorney to have your documents drafted, it’s well worth doing so. I love bling bridles and other fun things we buy for ourselves and our horses. But putting off getting that bling bridle for a month or two can provide you with the right documents to protect you and your business.

Contact me today to learn how I can help you make sure you have a valid Massachusetts liability release.

This blog post is for educational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship.  Seek an attorney’s advice for your specific situation. 

The Trouble with Photos

trusts, wills, horse lawI don’t know about you but one of the fun things about owning a horse business is that I get to look at horse photos practically every day. I love to look at horses and to photograph them (the photo to the left is one I took of my rescue Mustang, Isuba). Whether it’s on our websites or social media, we need to use a lot of photos with horses in order to talk about our businesses. There are literally millions of horse photos online. Really. I just did a Google search for “horse image” and got 1,990,000,000 results in .52 seconds.

But wait. Whoa. Not so fast. Did you read the viral story about the hipster? Yes, this does connect to your use of horse photos. A hipster guy got so mad thinking a journal had used his photo without permission when it reported on a study about hipsters that he threatened to sue the journal. The funny part of the story is that the photo wasn’t him but it confirmed the study results that hipsters tend to conform to a certain look. What’s important for us is the story behind the photo.

The journal had bought the hipster photo from Getty Images. You have may have bought their photos or spent time looking at their horse pictures. The journal’s editor-in-chief contacted Getty, and it had a signed release from the model in the picture. That release was worth its weight in gold because it showed the man who emailed was not in the photo and therefore had no legal action against the journal or Getty.

You hopefully now see where I am going with this and your horse photos. A lot of horse people download photos from the Internet of horses and riders. You should not use these photos on your website or social media unless you or the company you bought them from have a model release. (Yes, I know…what about pictures from horse shows. I will get to that issue in a blog this week, I promise.) Chances are good that you are going to have to pay for high-quality horse photos that you can use legally. Places like Getty, which has some stunning photos, may be a bit pricey for your budget, although the photos are certainly worth it. Take a look at a site like PixelRockstar. You can get photos for about $1 a picture.

I know that copyright and horse photos is a huge topic. Stay tuned to my blog as I continue to explore how we can use horse photos with our businesses.

This blog post is for educational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship.  Seek an attorney’s advice for your specific situation. 

The horse industry is big business

Graphic courtesy of the University of Minnesota Equine Extension Program. Used with Permission and Credited.
You may have heard the joke about “How do you make a small fortune with a horse business?”  Answer: You start with a large one! For years now, I have heard people say you can’t make a living working with horses. When we say something repeatedly, we tend to start to believe it. But what if the story of not being able to make a living with horses is actually false? What if you can make a living?

Recently, the University of Minnesota Equine Extension Program shared the graphic to the left on its Facebook page. Contrary to what you may have heard, the horse industry is booming. And it’s doing so because of equine business owners. Think of how many businesses it takes to maintain horses. A short list includes vets, farriers, feed stores, hay producers, tack stores, equine dentists, equine chiropractors, equine massage therapists, horse trainers, riding instructors, clinicians, horse breeders, horse associations, and horse rescuers.

One of the keys to being successful as an equine entrepreneur is to realize that while you love working in the horse world, it is a business. That means it has to be run as one. You have to start with a business plan and the correct business formation. You need legal contracts drafted by an equine attorney. You need to protect your company with a trademark. You need a marketing plan. You may need liability insurance. You may need documents specific to your equine business, such as barn rules. If you have all of these things in place as you start your business, it is easier to assess where and how you need to make changes if something isn’t working right or if you want to expand your business.

If you feel passionate about horses, contact me so we can discuss how I can help you start, build, or rebrand your equine business with my equine legal and business consulting services.

This blog post is for educational purposes only.  It does not create an attorney-client relationship.  Seek an attorney’s advice for your specific situation.